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Sometimes even the best of times come to an end. A few Renzell Restaurants are, sadly, closing at the end of this year: Betony and Soto in New York, Range in San Francisco, and Perennial Virant in Chicago. And DC's Ocopa has already closed its doors.

Betony, a beacon of urbanity on West 57th St, and one of the original Renzell Restaurants, is run by Eamon Rockey, a restaurateur by trade but a bon vivant by practice, and chef Bryce Shuman. They originally met at Eleven Madison Park before transforming the former kitsch-filled Brasserie Pushkin.  

The numbers don’t lie: Betony ranks #1 in hospitality on Renzell (and top 10 in cocktails, design, food, and service). 

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Soto, the non-descript uni palace in the West Village, and a recently named Renzell Restaurant, is ending a more than decade long run in the West Village. Sotohiro Kosugi—a master with a knife and a multitude of creative glazes and reductions—has run Soto with aplomb for more than a decade. Kosugi is returning to Japan, which may be reason enough for a trip in the future. 

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Range, one of the original pioneers on the Valenica strip in the mission, is closing after more than a dozen years. Phil West, owner and chef, returned to the kitchen a few years back returning the modern dining room to the forefront of creativity. West was a master at indulgent foods, but Range stood alone with it's forward thinking cocktails. 

Ocopa, located along Washington, DC’s H Street Corridor, has permanently closed its doors. The Peruvian restaurant was well known for its signature Pisco Sours, ceviche and one-of-a-kind brunch menu. With touches of Asian influence, Ocopa melded its Peruvian flavors into the raw fish and potato dishes that dot the menu.

In Chicago, Perennial Virant will be closing until the beginning of May. Its chef, Paul Virant, will be leaving at the end of the year. Boka Restaurant will use this break to “reconcept following a final service on New Year’s Eve, and a new restaurant with two new partners should open in the spring,” according to Eater Chicago.

Post updated on December 20, 2016.